Top 10 Features of The German Patent Office’s DEPATISnet: Part 2

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In the previous post we discussed the unique features of DEPATISnet, official search system of the German Patent and Trademark Office (DPMA).  Stephen Adams, in Information Sources in Patents, 2nd edition, described the secure connection options and the IKOFAX query language available through DEPATISnet.   Other important features of the system include its English language interface, IPC search and concordance section, and the expert search form that helps users create complex queries in a command line interface.

Today we look at five more useful features of the DEPATISnet system.  Can you view and download PDFs through the site?  What other search forms are available?  Read on to find out!

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Top 10 Features of The German Patent Office’s DEPATISnet: Part 1

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DEPATISnet has many more useful features than your average free patent search system.  According to Stephen Adams in Information Sources in Patents, 2nd edition (see left sidebar), DEPATISnet is a “multi-country portal providing search access to a range of countries via the DPMA (German Patent and Trademark Office)” (154).  So is DEPATISnet just a German version of Espacenet?  What makes this search system unique?  Some remarks by Adams  from Information Sources in Patents piqued my interest:

The characteristics of this site are somewhat different from other free-of-charge portals, in that it offers the option of secure (https) access and a much more sophisticated command language, based upon the IKOFAX system used within the DPMA. (154)

I was particularly intrigued by the secure browsing option available through DEPATISnet.  The only problem, though, is that the second edition of Information Sources in Patents was published in 2006.  Is the secure browsing option still available today?  And what are some other interesting features of the DEPATISnet system?

I guess it’s time to pay a visit to DEPATISnet, in order to answer all of my questions.  Let’s take a look at the system’s top features!

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Free Patent Alert Services: US Patents and Applications

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In a previous post, we discussed free patent search sites that allowed users to browse and view the full text of US patents and applications.  While reading Information Sources in Patents (2nd edition) by Stephen Adams (listed under “Recommended” in the left side bar of the blog), I learned about another free service related to US patent documents.  According to Adams, “in the United States, due to the free availability of US patent data, an entire cottage industry of ‘alert providers’ has grown in recent years” (168).   I know that alert services for recently published patent applications and granted patents (via RSS or email) are available for most subscription databases. Even some free search systems by national or regional patent authorities, like espacenet, allow users to create alerts for certain classes or keyword searches.   I had heard of an alerting service by a free patent search site, SumoBrain, but this feature was only a small part of the entire search system.

I was curious about these free, commercially produced alert services for US patent documents.  Were they worth using? After all, according to Landon IP librarian Kristin Whitman, “alerting services are only as good as the timeliness and comprehensiveness of their coverage.”   Read on to discover the positive and negative aspects of two free patent alert services for US patent documents!

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How I found my way in patent information

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Our online community for discussing challenges in patent and prior art search, Intellogist, has now been around for a few years.  Recently somebody asked me a tricky question regarding patent families, and I soon found myself digging through my personal files.  Some of the older stuff I turned up sent me down memory lane, and I figured the blog would be the perfect place to reminisce.

The days when I was first putting Intellogist content together didn’t feel very productive.  Mostly they were spent reading and cross referencing the existing literature on patent information sources – of which there was, or so it seemed to me, surprisingly little.  This industry is so important, yet its practices are so lightly documented.   It might astonish you to know that before I put together the information in the earliest Intellogist glossary articles and reports,  I had to perform literally months of research.   I was actually quite hard on myself about it, really, because I was sure a perfectly drawn, crystal clear, up-to-date article on the history of patent families and other patent information developments had to be floating out there on the internet, ready for anyone to read.

If that document exists, I haven’t found it yet (so please forward it to me at your earliest opportunity).  In this post I’ll share what resources worked for me, and I’ll give some perspective on what it means to be just starting out in this industry.

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News round-up: exciting patent and non-patent developments

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This week has yielded some interesting discoveries for me as I’ve been combing the industry for Intellogist-worthy news.  My hot list for the week includes national patent office websites, an update on Zotero and the best of World Patent Information!

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