Subsidiary Search: An Introduction

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Columbus Day is fast approaching in the States, where we celebrate Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the Americas by watching Val Kilmer and Wilmer Valderrama attempt to act. Now the movie studio system that green-lights such movies is filled with a labyrinth of companies, subsidiaries, and affiliates that all come together to write, produce, shoot, finance, and do everything else that needs to be done to complete the movie magic that ends up on the big screen (or straight to DVD in the case of the aforementioned movie) for your viewing enjoyment. Say you’ve just watched a stinker and want to know every person who was responsible for wasting the last 93 minutes of your life, but don’t want to watch the credits for fear of your eyes melting, then a good old subsidiary search is what ails you. Find out more after the jump…


So you know the name of the company you are interested in, want to know everything about them, but don’t know where you start. How about their website! You might have to dig, but somewhere on there, they will likely spell out their corporate structure. If the company is public, SEC or other public filing data can be examined to determine their holdings. Some of the reading may be dry and filled with jargon, but if you use all of your searching powers and your best judgement, you should be able to find out a baseline corporate structure.

Phew, you’ve spent hours looking through all that information, and have determined all of the listed subsidiaries of your hated movie studio. However, you have that nagging feeling you may have missed something of value, like when you leave for vacation and aren’t totally sure if you shut off the water and locked all the doors to the house. You don’t want to risk it, so how do you double-check your work? Try checking the corporate tree from a reliable provider. There are several available that can help you determine if you are on the right track. Once you have your list of names, you might want to properly search for all the IP they have, so you can exploit it and crush them. But that’s a topic for another day…

Next time: Danny has a movie night featuring the back catalog of Wilmer Valderrama. He immediately regrets it.

Find previous writings and musings from the off-kilter Danny Rooney here: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #11, #12.

Patent Information from Landon IP

This post was contributed by Registered Patent Agent Dan Wolka and edited by Chris Jagalla. The Intellogist blog is provided for free by Intellogist’s parent company, Landon IP, a major provider of patent search, technical translation, and information services.

3 Responses

  1. […] musings from the off-kilter Danny Rooney here: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #11, #12, #13, […]

  2. […] musings from the off-kilter Danny Rooney here: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #11, #12, #13, #14, […]

  3. […] musings from the off-kilter Danny Rooney here: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #11, #12, #13, #14, #15, […]

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