Exporting Citations/Bibliographies in ProQuest and Scopus

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Creation of citations (or bibliographies, to be specific) within non-patent literature search systems is an important feature for professional searchers. It allows searchers to translate their relevant search results into a convenient format for the recipient of the search. It’s crucial that this process be standardized and easy for the prior art searchers to conduct, so that information is not lost in the process. Another great benefit of a well-developed system is that the search recipient can develop a system to use the results, such as purchasing full versions of what may only have been bibliographic and abstract information. Reflecting these issues, there has been an increase in the profile of reference manager software, such as RefWorks and Zotero. ProQuest and Scopus tap into this development; both systems use technology developed by RefWorks.

To that end, we’ll take a look at how two well established non-patent literature search systems handle the creation of citations/bibliographies: ProQuest and Scopus.


ProQuest

In ProQuest, citation export (the terminology of ProQuest; i.e. bibliography generation) is available from the results page, saved documents, or individual documents. Multiple citations can be generated at-once by selecting multiple documents via a checklist, prior to clicking on the “Cite” button. Citations are generated by RefWorks, and can be copy/pasted, emailed, printed, or downloaded directly from the interface as a Word doc, HTML, or Text file. Citations can also be exported in RefWorks, ProCite, EndNote, or Reference Manager formats for further modification

ProQuest Citation

The ProQuest citation interface allows for quick copy/paste of the citation, along with fast change of format.

ProQuest has the following bibliography formats available:

  • APA 6th – American Psychological Association, 6th Edition
  • APA 5th – American Psychological Association, 5th Edition
  • APA 6th – Annotated with Abstracts – American Psychological Association, 6th Edition
  • APA 5th – Annotated with Abstracts – American Psychological Association, 5th Edition
  • AMA – American Medical Association, 10th Edition
  • ASA – American Sociological Association, 3rd Edition
  • BibTeX
  • Chicago 15th Edition (Author-Date System)
  • Chicago 15th Edition (Notes & Bibliography)
  • Council of Biology Editors – CBE 6th, Citation-Sequence
  • Council of Biology Editors – CBE 6th, Name-Year Sequence
  • Harvard
  • Harvard – British Standard
  • MLA 7th Edition
  • MLA 6th Edition
  • MLA 6th Edition, Annotated with Abstracts
  • Turabian 7th Edition (Notes)
  • Turabian 7th Edition (Reference List)
  • Uniform – Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals
  • Vancouver

Scopus

Scopus can create bibliography entries (i.e. citations as defined above by ProQuest) using QuickBib, developed in conjucntion with RefWorks. Bibliographies can be created from the results lists, my lists, saved lists, or from individual documents or document references. Word, RTF, HTML, and text formats are available for export, or users can print or email right on the spot. Creating a bibliography (without exporting) brings up a web page with selectable text for copy/paste purposes. Users can create multiple bibliographies at once, via multiple document selection in the lists or results interfaces.

Scopus bibliography

The Scopus bibliography generation has several options and formats available.

Scopus has the following bibliography formats available:

  • APA – American Psychological Association, 5th Edition
  • BibTeX
  • Council of Biology Editors – CBE 6th, Citation-Sequence
  • Chicago 15th Edition (Author-Date System)
  • Harvard
  • Harvard-British Standard
  • MLA 6th Edition – Single Spaced Reference List
  • NLM – National Library of Medicine
  • Turabian (Reference List) 6th Edition
  • Uniform – Uniform Requirements of Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals

As you can see above, ProQuest and Scopus are very similar in their citation/bibliography exporting abilities. ProQuest does have an advantage in that the citations included the digital object identifier, which can be handy in finding the original document later. ProQuest also had more supported formats (although Scopus had the most important ones covered).

How do you deal with citation/bibliographic export? Let us know in the comments below! In a future Intellogist Blog, we’ll detail how to accurately generate citations/bibliographies for non-standard and free non-patent literature search systems, so keep an eye out!

Patent Information from Landon IP

This post was contributed by Intellogist Team member Chris Jagalla. The Intellogist blog is provided for free by Intellogist’s parent company Landon IP, a major provider of patent searches, trademark searches, technical translations, and information retrieval services.

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